The Lord Delights in His People

Today’s readings are rich in imagery: ancestors, godly men, virtues, the Lord delighting in his people, bearing fruit, the withered fig tree, the temple area comotion, faith in God, prayer and forgiveness are found within these verses. 

My attention keeps coming back to the last line of the Gospel, “When you stand to pray, forgive anyone against whom you have a grievance, so that your heavenly Father may in turn forgive you your transgressions.”  Mk 11:25  This is vital to living in right relationship with the Father. 

As a chosen one of God, created in His image, I have been called to honor (pray), witness (serve, act) and bear fruit to the truth of the Way for all of creation.

The ultimate love of the Father was the sacrifice of his Son, Jesus Christ. He showed us the Way of life through his example of love and prayer, service and sacrifice. Jesus forgives all because He loves all, even when someone’s actions hurt or take advantage of others.

Being chosen means I have to acknowledge being human. I am accountable for the good and the bad choices and decisions in my life. I am to be as forgiving as Jesus and my Father are to all. The biggest challenge is to do that every moment of everyday; to show compassion and extend forgiveness to everyone through the Spirit and the love of God outpoured in the world.

God takes delight in His people. God takes delight in you. The following songs help me take the next step on the Way.

Chosen, Sidewalk Prophets
Help is on The Way, TobyMac
Truth be Told, Matthew West
Aware, Salvador

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She is a Secular Franciscan (OFS) and a practicing spiritual director. Beth shares smiles, prayers, laughter, a listening ear and her heart with all of creation. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Life in Him

The readings today remind us that our focus needs to be on God. The First Reading from the Acts of the Apostles, St. Paul tells us “…in him we live and move and have our being”. The Gospel has Jesus telling the disciples, “I have much more to tell you, but you cannot bear it now. But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth.”


We’ve been given the Spirit of truth to guide us on our way in life. We’ve been asked to do what is ours to do by trusting in His ways and to follow the Spirit. This is metanoia; changing our heart to a deeper communion and connection with Christ. We are called to be prophets of a future not of our choosing but that of the Lord.

Bishop Ken Untener expressed that wonderfully in the following prayer:

It helps, now and then, to step back and take a long view.

The kingdom is not only beyond our efforts, it is even beyond our vision.

We accomplish in our lifetime only a tiny fraction of the magnificent

enterprise that is God’s work. Nothing we do is complete, which is a way of

saying that the Kingdom always lies beyond us.

No statement says all that could be said.

No prayer fully expresses our faith.

No confession brings perfection.

No pastoral visit brings wholeness.

No program accomplishes the Church’s mission.

No set of goals and objectives includes everything.

This is what we are about.

We plant the seeds that one day will grow.

We water seeds already planted, knowing that they hold future promise.

We lay foundations that will need further development.

We provide yeast that produces far beyond our capabilities.

We cannot do everything, and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that.

This enables us to do something, and to do it very well.

It may be incomplete, but it is a beginning, a step along the way, an

opportunity for the Lord’s grace to enter and do the rest.

We may never see the end results, but that is the difference between the master

builder and the worker.

We are workers, not master builders; ministers, not messiahs.

We are prophets of a future not our own.      

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She is a Secular Franciscan (OFS) and a practicing spiritual director. Beth shares smiles, prayers, laughter, a listening ear and her heart with all of creation. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Branches on the True Vine

“I am the vine, alleluia; you are the branches, alleluia”, is the antiphonal refrain before the canticle of Zechariah in this morning’s Divine Office. Throughout the Office and today’s Readings we find God’s people and all of creation rejoicing that Jesus Christ is Risen. The Psalm today calls to us, “Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord.”

In the Gospel Jesus proclaims, “Remain in me, as I remain in you, whoever remains in me will bear much fruit.” Jesus continues speaking to his disciples saying, “Whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit, because without me you can do nothing.”

Rejoicing, dancing, joy and fruits are part of my offertory to God. I say only part because I frequently forget that there is work to be done; the pruning and cleaning of my own branch on the true vine. It is an essential part in the natural progression of any life cycle. There are times of growth, dormancy or rest and purging inherent to growth in life to produce good fruit. 

I get stuck on pruning and purging, getting rid of the things and thoughts that can damage and inhibit new growth. I have clothes, shoes, containers, and things I’ve saved because I will ‘reuse’ them. There are items that have sentimental value but have no function or purpose in my life that need to be let go. There are parts of my life that require pruning to facilitate new growth, not just collecting cobwebs and dust, slowly suffocating and dying.

Many of my things can be of service or value to someone who’s beginning a new chapter in life; those will be donated. Some things need to be recycled and others thrown out. I also must nurture my way of life with the sacraments and teachings of the Catholic Church and the study of all the Bible, especially the Gospel. It’s as necessary to do as putting food into my body, breathing air, getting rest, interacting with others, praying, mourning and rejoicing. It is all part of the cycle of life for a healthy branch of the True Vine.

Rejoice, read scripture, attend Mass, interact with the community, live the Gospel, prune, rest, repeat! 

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She is a Secular Franciscan (OFS) and a practicing spiritual director. Beth shares smiles, prayers, laughter, a listening ear and her heart with all of creation. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Instrument of God

The readings today mention arguing, threats, and persecution. Those same readings emphasise faith, trust, baptism, learning, resurrection and Eucharist. 

“Why are you persecuting me,” is a much too common phrase in numerous situations right here in the USA and globally. Each and everyone who suffers is a beloved son or daughter of God.

Too frequently in the world, we hear the sentiment expressed by Ananias about Saul doing evil things to His holy ones. Ananias listens to the directions of the Lord. As a chosen instrument of God, Ananias heals Saul. He baptizes him and instructs him in The Way. Paul then goes out to teach and tell the world the Good News of our Risen Lord, Jesus Christ.

I am a chosen instrument of God. I have not always accepted the invitation to receive Jesus’ love and mercy as Saul did. I have had to look at my actions and reactions to life and learn to let go of past actions, hurts, and injuries. I’ve had to explore what I’ve done and what I’ve failed to do which keeps me off the path that leads me to right relationship with God, my fellow man, and all of creation.

This is not a one-and-done process, a checklist, or an examination either. I’m human and make mistakes numerous times throughout the day in judgment, verbal and nonverbal responses to what is going on around me. I need to take time to reflect and notice how scales or blinders on my own eyes have held me back from being a better instrument of the Lord.

During this Easter season rejoice in knowing that you are God’s beloved instrument, wherever you are on your journey in life.

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Let us be Glad and Rejoice

Rejoice! It is Monday in the octave of Easter.

The Gospel today begins with the Marys quickly leaving the tomb, fearful yet overjoyed. Then behold; they meet Jesus on their way and He greeted them. Wow. What a surprise! Imagine the excitement and joy that filled them at meeting the Master. I break out smiling picturing this scene in my mind while my heart fills with overwhelming love.

Each of the days during the octave continue the celebration of Easter. The following prayer written by St. Francis of Assisi helps me to keep the joy and wonder of the season alive in my heart. May the phrases resonate with yours as well.

Holy, holy, holy Lord God Almighty,

Who is and Who was and Who is to come.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

O Lord our God, You are worthy to receive

praise and glory and honor and blessing.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

The Lamb Who was slain is worthy to receive

power and divinity, and wisdom and strength,

and honor and glory and blessing.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Let us bless the Father and the Son with the Holy Spirit.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Bless the Lord all you works of the Lord:

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Sing praise to our God, all you His servants

and you who fear God, the small and the great.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Let the heavens and the earth praise Him Who is glorious.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Every creature that is in heaven and on earth and under the earth

and in the sea and those which are in it.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever.

Let us praise and glorify Him forever.

All-powerful, most holy, most high, and supreme God:

all good, supreme good, totally good,

You Who are alone are good;

may we give You all praise, all glory, all thanks, all honor:

all blessing, and all good.

So be it!

So be it!

Amen.

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Fresh Insight

The scene in the Gospel today has many Jews picking up rocks to stone Jesus for blasphemy, for making himself God. The people do not recognize that Jesus’ teachings and his works (miracles) have been done to help them believe and understand, “that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.”

How many times have I made a judgement in my mind about a situation, and yet there is an unsettled feeling (if I’m paying attention) deep in my heart? Maybe there is more going on in a circumstance than I’m willing to admit to myself.

A wise woman once said, “Sometimes the longest journey we make is the sixteen inches from our heads to our hearts.” It could be that I am blind to a different perspective, position, interpretation or view of a situation. Am I willing to be honest with myself, to take some time in prayer and to delve more deeply into that instance from a different angle or voice?

On this fifth Friday of our Lenten journey, let us pray for the Holy Spirit to bring a fresh breath of insight into our minds, our hearts and our prayers this Holy Week.

PRAYER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT

Come Divine Spirit –

Rattle our cages –

Break into our locked houses –

Water our parched land –

Undo our bends and twistedness –

Awaken our hearts –

Help us to overflow with kindness –

And – 

Give us unending joy!

AMEN!     
(From an Ancient Pentecost Liturgy)

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Set Free

Lent is well underway, with today being the second Wednesday of this holy season. Typically, it’s the time that I usually catch myself slipping on my intentions for the season as well. This year I’m working on fasting from cynicism, snarkiness and complaining (csc).

Yes, you read that correctly. I’m trying to treat csc as the hunter’s snare or a path that causes another person pain, injury or unjust persecution. I’m trying to catch myself before I act on those thoughts, either in my mind or out loud, spoken or typed, in public or private.

It is a struggle, to be sure, but not an unusual one. In the reading from Jeremiah, the people of Judah and Jerusalem look to ‘destroy him by his own tongue…carefully note his every word.’ The Psalm takes this issue up by referring to ‘the snare they set for me.’

‘God himself will set me free from the hunter’s snare,’ is prayed every morning and evening in the Liturgy of the Hours during Lent. It reminds me that I must turn to God to help me avoid the traps and situations which can lead me into a bad or sinful choice.

I must remember that Jesus, the Son of Man, my God and my all, came to earth and gave his life as a ransom, a sacrifice for me and for the whole world. He was ransomed so I, so you, can be set free.

Today is the feast of St. Katharine Drexel She is a great example of setting aside the trappings of this world (including wealth and comfort in high society) to work for racial and social justice, especially for Native Americans and African Americans.

Pray with me these words of St. Katharine ‘Mother’ Drexel as the path of this Lenten journey continues.

“Teach me to know your Son intimately, to love Him ardently, and to follow Him closely.

It is a lesson we all need – to let alone the things that do not concern us. He has other ways for others to follow Him; all do not go by the same path. It is for each of us to learn the path by which He requires us to follow Him and to follow Him in that path.

The patient and humble endurance of the cross – whatever nature it may be – is the highest work we have to do.” Amen.

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Healing

Healing is again the focus in the Gospel today. Jesus heals all with no exceptions to the understood or unwritten norms and social concepts of the time.

In his Monday address to the ambassadors to the Holy See, Pope Francis said ‘the world is facing crises in five areas: in health, in the environment, on economic and social issues, in politics, and in human relationships.’ Our world needs healing, our human interactions need healing in so many ways and in so many circumstances. I do too.

My pastor has emphasized the need for deep healing, the kind that comes from the hand of Jesus and His Divine Spirit. The sins, omissions and tacit consents that are embedded deep in the heart which blind me to the indifference and abuse of the integrity of all that God has created in this world, I need to bring into my awareness and confessions.

It is the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes  and the 29th World Day to Pray for the Sick. There are several resources below including a virtual tour of Lourdes and a 30 minute prayer service celebrating this day of prayer for the sick.

I ask that you pray with me the words St. John Paul II wrote in 2004 for the intercession of our Blessed Virgin Mother, the Immaculate Conception, Our Lady of Lourdes. Let us pray,

To Mary, Mother of tender love,

we wish to entrust all those

who are ill in body and soul,

that she may sustain them in hope.

We ask her also to help us to be welcoming

to our sick brothers and sisters.

Hail Mary, poor and humble Woman,

Blessed by the Most High!

Virgin of hope, dawn of a new era,

We join in your song of praise,

to celebrate the Lord’s mercy,

to proclaim the coming of the Kingdom

and the full liberation of humanity.

Hail Mary, lowly handmaid of the Lord,

Glorious Mother of Christ!

Faithful Virgin, holy dwelling-place of the Word,

Teach us to persevere in listening to the Word,

and to be docile to the voice of the Spirit,

attentive to His promptings in the depths of our conscience

and to His manifestations in the events of history.

Hail Mary, Woman of sorrows,

Mother of the living!

Virgin spouse beneath the Cross, the new Eve,

Be our guide along the paths of the world.

Teach us to experience and to spread the love of Christ,

to stand with you before the innumerable crosses

on which your Son is still crucified.

Hail Mary, woman of faith,

First of the disciples!

Virgin Mother of the Church, help us always

to account for the hope that is in us,

with trust in human goodness and the Father’s love.

Teach us to build up the world beginning from within:

in the depths of silence and prayer,

in the joy of fraternal love,

in the unique fruitfulness of the Cross.

Holy Mary, Mother of believers,

Our Lady of Lourdes,

pray for us. Amen

Pope Francis’ message for the 29th world day of Prayer for the Sick

World Day of the Sick Prayer Service 2021

29th World Day of Prayer for the Sick

Prayer Cards for the Sick, for Caregivers

Virtual Tour of Lourdes, France

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

Feature Image Credit: Aarón Blanco Tejedor, https://unsplash.com/photos/QUGWB1kqjQI

Take Comfort

It’s St. Brigid’s feast day in Ireland and the first day of spring, too. I’m a third generation immigrant. This means I have two U.S.-born parents but at least one foreign-born grandparent, I think. My Dad was adopted when he was 5 days old. The woman I knew as grandma was born in Ireland. I’ve many fond memories and a shared love of tea from Grandma B which gives me great comfort.

Praying with and reflecting on the readings today have taken me on a challenging path. I get so caught up in the noise and distraction of this world and the many situations which seem to continue to develop and fester without clear direction or resolution. This seems to mirror what is written about in the First Reading. The last two lines stand out, “Yet all these, though approved because of their faith, did not receive what had been promised. God had foreseen something better for us, so that without us they should not be made perfect.”

Ok, God’s got something better in mind. That’s comforting, yet, frustrating in the moment, especially since the time that it takes for a resolution to present itself is in God’s time not mine. The Responsorial Psalm reminds me to take comfort, all who hope in the Lord. I have to remember to offer the situations to God, and to focus on how I can bring his healing presence into the world through my actions and prayers.

The chains and shackles do not restrain or help the man in which ‘Legion’ lives in the Gospel scene. Could the man represent our world and the social situations which continue to challenge and injure humanity? I believe so. I believe that Jesus can heal our world and social situations as He healed the man in this scripture passage.

Below I’ve compiled some resources that gave me some comfort in realizing I’m not alone in feeling out of sorts about the world right now. Say this prayer to St Brigid, to bring comfort today.

Brigid, you were a woman of peace. You brought harmony where there was conflict. You brought light to the darkness. You brought hope to the downcast. May the mantle of your peace cover those who are troubled and anxious, and may peace be firmly rooted in my heart and in the world. Inspire me to act justly and to reverence all God has made. You were a voice for the wounded and the weary. Strengthen what is weak within me. Calm me into a quietness that heals and listens. May I grow each day into greater wholeness in mind, body and spirit.  Amen.

How a Year Without Hugs Affects Our Mental Health
Prayers during the Pandemic
Moral Injury, Volunteers of America
Truth be Told

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

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Hope

There is a light snow falling as I write. It covers the dulled yellow and green grasses that are still visible here in West Michigan, making things look fresh. Snow on roadways can be quite treacherous. There are many who forget that traction, and a wet or snowy surface, can result in sliding, slipping, spinning, and much greater stopping distances.

If you’ve ever been in mud, on a dirt road, caught a patch of ice or snow, in a way you didn’t intend, with a vehicle or on foot, you know what I mean. Suddenly you can lose all sense of direction or feel caught in slow motion while being out of control of the situation. I kinda feel like that when looking at what has been going on in our country, on so many levels and in so many situations. It can be overwhelming to know where to focus. The readings today can help.

“We earnestly desire each of you to demonstrate the same eagerness for the fulfillment of hope until the end…hold fast to the hope that lies before us”, is a directive from the First Reading. The Gospel acclamation calls out, “May the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ enlighten the eyes of our hearts, that we may know what is the hope that belongs to our call.” 

My focus is on hope. It’s the hope and promise of God. The Lord of the sabbath is my hope. I am to be His hands, his body, hope and love in this world. It is my charge, given through the waters of baptism.

“Hope has two beautiful daughters. Their names are anger and courage. Anger that things are the way they are. Courage to make them the way they ought to be.” St. Augustine of Hippo

Please spend some time with the links you find here. My prayer is that you too may find hope to do what is yours to do to keep hope alive in this world as Joyce Rupp so beautifully said,

Faithful Companion,

in this new year I pray:

to live deeply, with purpose,

to live freely, with detachment,

to live wisely, with humility,

to live justly, with compassion

to live lovingly, with fidelity,

to live mindfully, with awareness,

to live gracefully, with generosity,

to live fully, with enthusiasm.

Help me to hold this vision and to daily renew it in my heart,

becoming ever more one with You, and my truest self.  Amen

You Keep Hope Alive

Hope Has a Name

Future + Hope

All My Hope

Hope for the Future

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

Feature Image Credit: Jessica Ruscello, https://unsplash.com/photos/lUtPqjz5D5k

Love is the Victor

The First Reading today begins, ‘the one who believes that Jesus is the Son of God, is indeed, victor over the world, through the Spirit, water and Blood of Christ.’

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states,  “The Word became flesh to be our model of holiness: ‘Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me.’ ‘I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but by me.’74 On the mountain of the Transfiguration, the Father commands: ‘Listen to him!’75 Jesus is the model for the Beatitudes and the norm of the new law: ‘Love one another as I have loved you.’76 This love implies an effective offering of oneself, after his example.”77(ccc 459)

It is through and because of God’s love, Jesus’ love, that the man with leprosy was healed in the Gospel. Love is the victor over the disease! This conviction is echoed in the reading from Isaiah in the morning office , “Turn to me and be safe, all you ends of the earth, for I am God; there is no other!” Love is the Victor of the world!

The Catechism goes on to say in ccc 872: “In virtue of their rebirth in Christ there exists among all the Christian faithful a true equality with regard to dignity and the activity whereby all cooperate in the building up of the Body of Christ in accord with each one’s own condition and function.”  It is through the Holy Spirit, the water and Blood of Christ that healing has been shared with all humanity.

The Victor of the world is love, God’s love. Fr. Casey Cole, ofm offers this perspective:

In the way we love one another, work for justice, and offer sacrifice—doing as Jesus did—we can actually make a difference in our world because it is in these moments that Christ dwells in us and the Holy Spirit is sent forth from us. What is it that we always pray? “Send down your Spirit and renew the face of the earth!” If we want to follow after Jesus, we must let go of our cynicism and bleak outlook on the world, and instead believe with all our hearts that Christ is in control of this mission. We must look beyond what is not yet redeemed and open our eyes to the overflowing torrent that is God’s love in our world, transforming and renewing the face of the earth. We must realize it is through us, those whom Jesus has called as his disciples, that this work is being accomplished.

Listen to the song from Friz Love, Heal the World Jesus . My hope is that God’s love transforms our world this year through faith, prayer and that which is each of ours to do in His kingdom on earth. Shalom

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

Feature Image Credit: Tim Marshall, https://unsplash.com/photos/cAtzHUz7Z8g

Blessed are You

The Gospel scene today is very familiar. As Mary greets her cousin Elizabeth, the baby she carries jumps in her womb. Elizabeth shares that joyful experience with Mary, crying out blessings on the infant and his Mother.

St. Ephraim the Syrian reflected on Mary’s perspective of the child in her womb, writing, “The Babe that I carry carries me.” Her ‘yes’ to Gabriel allowed the much anticipated eternal light to enter the world in human form.

The O Antiphon for today echoes this theme. ‘O Radiant Dawn, splendor of eternal light, sun of justice: come and shine on those who dwell in darkness and in the shadow of death.’

Today and throughout all of history there exist times of darkness, death, new life and light. These recurring themes are ripe for several moments of quiet meditation. When you have the time, reread the above three paragraphs and sit with the images, feelings, memories or words that are brought to your mind. You can also click on one of the links below to help focus your thoughts.

Be gentle with yourself, especially if this is a new type of experience for you. There is no right or wrong way to reflect because what comes to mind is part of your unique spiritual journey. Take a few notes, journal, draw or just acknowledge what comes to you.

Carry the images or words in your mind for the day. Know that God is there with you through all of your experiences. Know that you have been created in His image and are loved. Believe that you are blessed.

Breath of Heaven, Mary’s Song
O Antiphons
Latin Chant of O Antiphons

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Beth Price is part of the customer care team at Diocesan. She brings a unique depth of experience to the group due to her time spent in education, parish ministries, sales and the service industry over the last 25 yrs. She is a practicing spiritual director as well as a Secular Franciscan (OFS). Beth is quick to offer a laugh, a prayer or smile to all she comes in contact with. Reach her here bprice@diocesan.com.

Feature Image Credit: Sharath Kumar Hari, https://unsplash.com/photos/Mb2LErousEY